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Mozambique - When and Where to Visit

Several times per year, we travel to Mozambique for an adventure in tropical paradise. This video captures the magic of a country that is one of the hidden gems of Africa.

Contact us to learn more about how you can incorporate a Mozambique Trip into your future internship program adventure.

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The climate in most of Mozambique is tropical and warm with a dry cooler season from April until September and a wet hot season with temperatures of around 28˚C at the coast from October until April. In winter the weather at the coast is sunny and pleasantly warm (the average temperature in Maputo in June and July is 19˚C). The dry and relatively cool winter months between April and September offer the most comfortable and easy travel conditions.

There is no major obstacle to visiting Mozambique during the summer months of November to April, except that climatic conditions are oppressively hot and humid at this time of year, especially along the north coast.

Temperatures and rainfall figures vary widely across the country. Hottest and most humid are the northeastern coast and the upper Zambezi Valley, while the coolest areas are those at higher altitudes, such as the highlands of Niassa and Nampula provinces. Most of northeastern and central Mozambique has an annual average rainfall in excess of 1,000mm, with the wettest part of the country being the highlands east of Malawi, where several areas experience almost 2,000mm of rain annually.

The south is generally much drier, with coastal regions south of Beira generally receiving around 900mm of rain and some parts of the interior of Gaza Province dropping to an average of below 500mm annually. The rainy season in the south runs from October to March, while north of the Zambezi it tends to start and end a month or two later.

When to visit

The coastal regions of Mozambique are best visited in the dry winter months of May through to October, when daytime temperatures are generally around 20–25°C. There is no major obstacle to visiting Mozambique during the summer months of November to April, except that climatic conditions are oppressively hot and humid at this time of year, especially along the north coast. Because most of the country’s rain falls during the summer months, there is also an increased risk of contracting malaria and of dirt roads being washed out.

Unless you are a South African with children at school, it is emphatically worth avoiding the south coast of Mozambique during South African school holidays, when campsites as far north as Vilankulo tend to be very crowded and hotels are often fully booked. The exact dates of South African school holidays vary slightly on a provincial basis, but the main ones to avoid are those for Gauteng (the province that includes Johannesburg, South Africa’s most populous city and only a day’s drive from Maputo).

To give a rough idea of the periods to avoid, there are four annual school holidays in Gauteng: a three-week holiday that starts in the last week of March and ends in the middle of April, a month-long holiday running from late June to late July, a two-week holiday starting in late September, and a six-week holiday from early December to mid-January (for exact dates, check www.schoolguide.co.za/school-holidays.html or contact a South African embassy).

If you do visit southern Mozambique during school holidays, then you should make reservations for all the hotels and campsites at which you plan to stay. School holidays in landlocked Zimbabwe see a substantial influx of Zimbabwean tourists into southern Mozambique, so that most resorts between Beira and Xai- Xai are more crowded than usual.

Provided you have a tent, you shouldn’t get stuck at these times. Few South Africans or Zimbabweans currently venture north of the Beira Corridor (the road and railway line linking Beira to the Zimbabwean border town of Mutare), so school holidays have no notable effect on tourist patterns in northern Mozambique.

SOURCE : https://www.bradtguides.com/destinations/africa/mozambique/when-and-where-to-visit.html

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